click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to everyone in rome and everyone in the vatican. >> reporter: as a cardinal, joseph ratzinger was known as john paul ii's enforcer of religious doctrine. he did not like answering questions. here's abc's brian ross asking him about a sexual abuse case in 2002. >> reporter: the question was -- >> come to me when the moment is given. but not yet. >> reporter: in his almost eight-year-olds as pope, he would sometimes play the piano. he always wore his prada-style red shoes. but his passion was preaching the gospel. he's never enjoyed being an administrator and he paid a price for that. his papacy will be remembered for its scandals. those endless sexual abuse coverups that cost more than $3 billion to settle. a string of financial scandals. benedict tried and failed to clean up corruption. and the notorious vatileaks scandal, with daily exposes in italian newspapers, a vatican back-stabbing in intrigue. he may have been the first pope to tweet, but as the leader, he tried to hold back the forces of modernity, refusing to expand the role of women. now, though, he is accepting the reality of
moments. >> reporter: joseph ratzinger was elected pope benedict xvi in april of 2005. the college of cardinals did not pick an unknown quantity. he was considered one of the catholic church's finest minds. he was the professor watching the back of his star-like predecessor john paul ii, whom he served as a trusted adviser and friend. many expected the severe german cardinal would bring his strict style to the papacy, and in some ways, he has. he reaffirmed the church's strong opposition to abortion, gay marriage, and euthanasia. in his first major ruling as pope, he imposed restrictions on homosexuals becoming priests. in the year following his election, during a trip to germany, pope benedict made perhaps the most controversial remarks of his papacy, addressing a group of scholars. he quoted a byzantine emperor, asserting the prophet muhammad brought things "only evil and inhuman." the comment sparked outrage and protests in many muslim countries. the pope tried to defuse the anger by clarifying the quote did not express his personal views but stopped short at an outright apology
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)